Tag Archives: honey bee habitat

beyond pesticides

Pesticide Free Parks in Northern Nevada and Beyond!

beyond pesticides

news reno pesticides
Reported by: Jaime Hayden

City of Reno beginning pesticide free pilot program

RENO, Nev. (MyNews4.com & KRNV) — A pesticide free training took place at Reno City Hall Tuesday. City officials learned alternative ways to keep Reno parks green, but with more natural products.

“We just want to get out ahead of the curve, to the extent we can, and protect our citizens,” said Reno Councilwoman Naomi Duerr.

The city of Reno is implementing a pesticide free pilot program at Reno parks. “We have 86 parks in Reno and what we are doing is moving out with 12 of them on a trial basis, experimental basis, to see if we can go pesticide free.”

Instead, parks will use more natural soil. Duerr believes the program is vital to our community. “We’re learning more about the impacts of chemicals both on our soil and on people, we want our parks to be as welcoming and safe as possible, and it’s a city council initiative.”

Duerr says the main goal of the program is to make Reno parks safer and more natural for kids to play in. “I think that would be wonderful, if they can find a way to do it more naturally and keep our parks still green and playable with playable surfaces, I think that would be wonderful,” said local mom Morningstar Helvey.

Beyond Pesticides, a non-profit group, explained to officials about the dangers of using chemicals. “We’re concerned about elevated rates of asthma in children and learning disabilities, and autism and long term effects such as cancer,” said Jay Feldman.

read full article on News 4 website here: http://www.mynews4.com/news/local/story/City-of-Reno-beginning-pesticide-free-pilot/DjzP_8LT6kStMYejN8ruOQ.cspx

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bees

How to save the bees?

organic flowers save beesHow to save the bees

Honeybees, leaf cutter bees, butterflies, lady bugs and all kinds of pollinators are in a fight for their life. Why? Bee Habitat loss.

Top 5 Reasons Why our Friendly Bugs are disappearing at an alarming rate:

1. Loss of habitat: Ever expanding shopping malls, apartment complexes and mini mansions are eating up what is left of their natural habitats.

2. Pesticide exposure: Every plant, tree, shrub, flower that you purchase from large or small garden shops have been treated with a systemic pesticide that can last up to 5 years on the woody parts of the plant. You cannot “wash” this pesticide off. Seeds are treated as well. These pesticides are called neonicotinoids, or NEONICS for short.

3.  The flower industry uses up to 50x’s the amount of pesticides. When buying flowers or plants for your loved one, you are sending them a beautiful bee trap. Thousands of florists each year suffer from debilitating diseases, tumors and health problems as a result.

4. Big AG uses a great deal of pesticides to grow mono crops to maximize their dead soils efficiency.  Round up, pesticides and bringing in bees from other parts of the country to pollinate their crops knowing the pesticides will kill the bees. They have to truck in pollinators as they have all but destroyed what was left of their local bee populations.

5. Lack of correct information to follow. So much misinformation is shared by well meaning and not so kind pesticide companies. Mommy bloggers are hired to write articles on bees and pesticides as well.

What can I do about this? How do I get started helping my local pollinators?

Buy organic. When ever you buy organic food, flowers and plants, you help an areas local pollinators make it through to another season. Organic farmers need bees to pollinate their crops and often plant wildflowers along side their crops to help attract them to their fields. Supporting a local organic farmer will help keep organics in the grocery isles. Encouraging more organic farmers will help repair the soil and eco system for a number of wildlife including bees. Try searching for a local supplier of organic bouquets, flowers and plants, but if you cannot find one, start your own or go online and search for organic garden shop, organic flowers or native plant garden shops. Most native plants should be pesticide free or neonic free. Planting local native plants will help save you water, energy and will not need to use synthetic fertilizers that kill the soil and harm your health.

Please ask your neighbors to do the same. Share this information with as many people as you can. Thank you for caring for our bees future as well as your own.

Sandy Rowley

www.BeeHabitat.com

 

 

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bee habitat

Money for Bee’s

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Pesticide-free bee garden a winner with realtors

bee gardenThe Reno/Sparks Association of REALTORS® (RSAR) has announced that the Pesticide Free Bee Garden Project was selected as the inaugural “REALTORS® Build a Better Block” project. The Pesticide Free Bee Garden Project received the most votes in a public vote conducted in October.

As the winning project, Bee Habitat, a group of local volunteers dedicated to creating pesticide-free bee gardens in northern Nevada, will receive $2,500.

With the funds, Bee Habitat will partner with Great Basin Institute at Galena to develop a pesticide-free bee garden and pollinator school curriculum centered around the Galena Creek Visitor Center on Mt. Rose Highway in Reno, Nev.

The project will include cleaning the designated park area, installing bee hotels that attract sting-less mason bees, as well as implementing pesticide-free landscaping alternatives to help Washoe County employees and volunteers manage the space.

The project will use bee-safe plants (plants never treated with neonics), as well as drought tolerant plants with minimum maintenance for county and volunteers. The project is scheduled to be completed in early 2015.

“One of every three bites of food eaten worldwide depends on pollinators, especially bees, for a successful harvest,” said Sandy Rowley, founder of Bee Habitat.

“However, for much of the past 10 years, beekeepers, primarily in the United States and Europe, have been reporting annual hive losses of 30 percent or higher. The main cause of bee decimation has been determined to be the extensive use of a class of pesticides known as neonicotinoids, now the world’s most widely used insecticide. Neonicotinoids are used by home owners for their gardens as well as professionals, and there is a general lack of knowledge about the pesticide and how to avoid its use,” Rowley continued.

Bee Habitat’s volunteers bring more than 40 years of experience with organic and permaculture-based landscaping services. In partnering with Great Basin Institute at Galena, Bee Habitat also provides educational field studies to Washoe County students and community programs for adults and families.

The Reno/Sparks Association of REALTORS® is an organization providing services to its members to ensure their success as real estate professionals, as well as protecting and promoting the consumer’s dream of homeownership. For more information visit www.rsar.net.

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