Tag Archives: reno

Bee Documentary – Pollinator Activist Shares Her Secret to Saving the bees

SANDY ROWLEY: THE BEE LADY OF RENO

News Source :
http://www.respectfulrevolution.org/#/road/videos/sandy_rowley_bee_lady_reno

It’s not everyday that a citizen, however concerned and dedicated, can get any level of power – public or private – to change course, even when it’s a matter of the common good. Meet the incredible Sandy Rowley, a gentle powerhouse of commitment when it comes to nature and public health. Sandy spearheaded the effort to get the city of Reno, NV and its parks department to create pesticide-free city areas and parks. After a couple years of researching the issue, getting like-minded folks together, insistently making phone calls and speaking at city council meetings, Sandy has put Reno on the map when it comes to pesticide-free parks. She didn’t do it all alone, but most folks in Reno credit her for setting a process in motion that’s now a national example of successful environmental activism.

Respectful Revolution Founders

GERARD UNGERMAN

An independent journalist and documentary filmmaker, Gerard studied English and Economics at the Sorbonne and served in the French military for 5 years. He moved to NYC and started Free-Will Productions in 1995. His hard-hitting documentaries have premiered around the world (Hidden Wars of Desert Storm, The Oil Factor: Behind the War on Terror, Plan Colombia: Cashing-In on the Drug War Failure). Witnessing firsthand the human and environmental toll of greed and carelessness led him to advocate for the respect of human dignity, nature and the world. A co-founder of the Respectful Living Institute, Gerard is happy to call Chico, CA home.

The founders of the Respectful Revolution

STACEY WEAR

A native Northern Californian, Stacey received a BA in Information & Communication Studies from CSU Chico. After living for two years in Japan and six on the island of Maui, she and her two daughters now call Chico home. When her partner, Gerard, a 20 year resident, was prevented by U.S. Immigration from returning home in 2010, her combination of life experiences culminated with the “Bring Gerard Home” fundraising and legal campaign. She most recently worked as Music Director at her community radio station, KZFR 90.1 FM. Dedicated to promoting love, kindness and respectfulness, Stacey is a passionate co-founder of the Respectful Living Institute.

Bee part of history! Join our 10,000 organic yard and lawns initiative here!

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This Wednesday @ Reno City Hall!

From Lisa Hill – Reno, Nv

Please consider submitting comments about the recent use of 2,4-D in the West Wash Dam area near Keystone Ave. for the Wednesday June 8 Reno City Council meeting.
You may submit comments by:
  • using an electronic public comment form by clicking this link.
  • writing to the contacts below, or
  • attending the meeting which starts at 10 am.  Public comment starts shortly thereafter.  Fill out a public comment card and give to the proctor.

Pesticide reno nv 2016The herbicide, associated with non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (a blood cancer) and sarcoma (a soft-tissue cancer), was distributed via blower specifically NOT recommended by state ag officials near private residences due to drift.  One of our neighbors experienced illness after being spraying in her back yard.  For some reason, spray was distributed late in the weed cycle with questionable benefit.

Mayor and Council:
 

Hillary Schieve <schieveh@reno.gov>

Neoma Jardon <jardonn@reno.gov>  ****our Ward 5 council person****

Naomi Duerr <duerrn@reno.gov> announced the pesticide-free park initiative

David Bobzien <bobziend@reno.gov> lives in our neighborhood

Jenny Brekhus <brekhusj@reno.gov>

Oscar Delgado <delgadoo@reno.gov>

Paul McKenzie <mckenziep@reno.gov>

City Liasions:

Meeting Details:

June 8 Reno City Council meeting: 
June 14 Ward 5 NAB meeting:
  • The Ward 5 NAB meetings are held the second Tuesday of each month from 5:30 – 7:30 pm in the Council Chambers, located on the 1st floor of Reno City Hall, One East 1st Street.
  • Public comment is held at the beginning of the meeting.  If you would like to speak, fill out a form and give it to the proctor.  You will have 3 minutes to speak. Keep in mind that speaking publicly is impactful.  Our council person Neoma Jardon usually attends this meeting.  It is smaller than a city council meeting and you will get more attention at this meeting.
Parking is available on the top floors of the Cal Neva lot, metered street parking, or downtown parking lot.

Thanks for your consideration.

Lisa Hill

 
Information about 2,4-D (or do your own research):
Source:  The Natural Resources Defense Council

2,4-D: The Most Dangerous Pesticide You’ve Never Heard Of

This toxic herbicide comes with known health risks, but it’s still being used on crops, in parks, and maybe even in your own backyard.

March 15, 2016

  • Danielle Sedbrook

One of the cheapest and most common weed killers in the country has a name you’ve probably never heard: 2,4-D. Developed by Dow Chemical in the 1940s, this herbicide helped usher in the clean, green, pristine lawns of postwar America, ridding backyards everywhere of aesthetic undesirables like dandelion and white clover. But 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, as it’s known to chemists, has a less wholesome side. There’s a growing body of scientific evidence that the chemical poses a danger to both human health and the environment.

Gavin Baker Photography/Shutterstock

The pesticide, which allows not just grasses but also fruits and vegetables to flourish, can attack both the roots and leaves of weeds by making the unwanted plant’s cells grow out of control—sort of like inducing cancer in the plant to kill it or drastically slow its spread. It’s used widely in agriculture in soybean, corn, sugarcane, and wheat fields, and it turns up in most “weed and feed” products as well as in many lawn treatments. The problem is, the herbicide that was once considered clean and green may no longer be safe by today’s standards.

The evidence is slowly mounting—but not yet conclusive. It’s not always easy to determine whether a particular substance is causing harm or just happens to be present when some other agent is to blame. Public health experts can’t always draw a firm conclusion from studies whose methodologies are lacking in scientific rigor. Take the link between chronic exposure to 2,4-D and cancer: “The evidence isn’t clear enough to draw conclusions with confidence, but it is better to take precautions to prevent possible cancers than to wait for more evidence,” says Jennifer Sass, an NRDC senior scientist.

Researchers have observed apparent links between exposure to 2,4-D and non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (a blood cancer) and sarcoma (a soft-tissue cancer). But both of these can be caused by a number of chemicals, including dioxin, which was frequently mixed into formulations of 2,4-D until the mid-1990s. Nevertheless, in 2015, the International Agency for Research on Cancer declared 2,4-D a possible human carcinogen, based on evidence that it damages human cells and, in a number of studies, caused cancer in laboratory animals.

More conclusive is the proof that 2,4-D falls into a class of compounds called endocrine-disrupting chemicals, compounds that mimic or inhibit the body’s hormones. Laboratory studies suggest that 2,4-D can impede the normal action of estrogen, androgen, and most conclusively, thyroid hormones. Dozens of epidemiological, animal, and laboratory studies have shown a link between 2,4-D and thyroid disorders. “That’s really important when we’re thinking about development,” says Kristi Pullen, a staff scientist in NRDC’sHealth program. “Our thyroid works to ensure the proper timing and development of the brain.”

There are reports that 2,4-D can decrease fertility and raise the risk of birth defects. But even though fetuses, infants, and children are at highest risk of these, no studies have looked directly at the effects of 2,4-D on those groups.

Despite concerns about potential health risks, in 2014 the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency approved the combined use of 2,4-D and the popular weed killer Roundup (also known as glyphosate, a whole other—and in many ways more worrying—story when it comes to health and the environment). Enlist Duo, as the combo is called, was already legal in several states. It is used mainly on big farms, where it is sprayed on genetically modified crops called Enlist soy and Enlist corn that have been engineered to be resistant to the poisons.

In other words, farmers can now douse their fields with high concentrations of the weed killer without worrying that it will also destroy their crops. Originally, plants genetically engineered to resist Roundup were sprayed with that herbicide alone. But when the weeds it was intended to kill also developed resistance, 2,4-D was added to make the mix more effective. As Pullen puts it, “These chemicals by themselves can be problematic, but when we start combining them with other toxic chemicals, we’re just creating a new problem in order to solve another problem.”

The U.S. Department of Agriculture estimates that by 2020, the use of 2,4-D on America’s farms could rise between 100 percent and 600 percent now that it has been approved as part of Enlist Duo. According to Pullen, “When you combine increased use with the potential for increased developmental, cancer, and other health impacts, you could create a perfect storm of hazard and exposure coming together.”

Also problematic: 2,4-D sticks around in the environment. Depending on the formulation, it can drift through the air from the fields where it is sprayed or be tracked inside homes by pets or children. By the EPA’s own measure, 2,4-D has already been detected in groundwater and surface water, as well as in drinking water. Australian scientists reported in 2012 that it was found in more than 90 percent of samples taken from agricultural catchments bordering the Great Barrier Reef—bad news for many fish, for whom the herbicide can be toxic. It can also poison small mammals, including dogs who can ingest it after eating grass treated with 2,4-D.
The easiest way to avoid 2,4-D is to avoid the products that contain it. You can ask your town whether 2,4-D is used in specific parks. You can also visit the website of the National Pesticide Information Center, which has easy-to-read fact sheets on 2,4-D and most other pesticides. If you think you, your child, or your pet have been in contact with plants recently treated with 2,4-D or any other pesticide, contact a poison-control center.
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Getting Good Things Done For Nevadans – A Year in Review

Thank you for wanting to learn more about Bee Habitat and our work. Our intentions are to save our pollinators, reduce pesticides and their affects on our health as well as pets and wildlife.

We have accomplished a great deal in a relatively short amount of time. Most of the work we do involves a steady commitment to make sure that our goals are met.  These goals include Cleaner water, air, land to grow healthy organic food, safe and healthy playgrounds, sports fields and parks for our children, pets, wildlife and to protect our future food supply by saving our pollinators.

We are constantly arranging meetings, going door to door, holding meetings in person and  on the phone with media and/or a volunteers looking to spread the word with our community.

Setting up classes and meetings with local parks and recreation departments at city, county and state levels. Calling school boards, requesting documentation of pesticide use around children. Providing proven organic solutions and case studies to encourage dependence on natural methods of pest management.

We leverage social media, email newsletters, phone trees as part of our outreach. Our focus is on a goal, not just spreading the word. Continuous and persistent communication & education with our local authorities on safer alternatives, case studies and solutions.

Liking a post on Facebook is helpful, but actually doing the ground work with your community is where the real magic takes place. Following through on our promises ensures success in our endeavors.

Want to actually do something great for our world? We would love to welcome you as a friend and a leader. Call Sandy at 775 453 6120.

Here are A list of items that Bee Habitat has achieved for the community in Northern Nevada over the course of one year:

1. Educated thousands of people on the harmful affects of weed killers and pesticide use. Taught safer alternatives and gave resources to help them make the switch to organic.

save-the-bees-reno-2014-pesticide-free-parks
BeeHabitat.com volunteers at our first meeting with Washoe County Parks Department.

2. Organized our first meeting with Washoe County, City of Sparks, City of Reno and Reno Urban Forester to discuss the improper use of toxic chemicals at city parks. Bee Habitat and a group of volunteers attended this meeting in hopes to motivate and education our parks departments to use safer alternatives at local parks. City of Sparks director offered Bee Habitat 27 parks as pesticide free, with some serious strings attached. Later fell through because of the fine print. Currently working to secure more parks and pesticide free signage with the Adopt a Park program with corporations and non profits. The key point here is, we did NOT GIVE UP and now have several cities and counties going pesticide free because of our work!

https://www.newsreview.com/reno/parks-rec/content?oid=14740680

ND4_6599

3. Organized and marketed a Peaceful Bee Parade on Riverside Drive in Reno Nv. 80 attendees, covered by Fox news. Children, pets and local activists dressed up as their favorite pollinator and took the streets of Reno dancing, drumming and singing their way to downtown Reno. Children and teens performed an art protest on stage at Wingfield Park Amphitheater. The same park is now converted and maintained as pesticide free a year later! https://www.facebook.com/events/322044251304480/

4. Scheduled and held private meetings with local politicians on the health benefits of going pesticide free. Researched free solutions to help the city make the switch to organic best practices and then presented to council .

5. Public comments at city hall educating the council members, mayor and public on pesticides and bee deaths. Worked with City Councilwoman Jenny Brekhus to create the Right To Know item that would make it mandatory for city employees to put signs up in areas that were recently treated with pesticides. This fell through because of lack of support. We are still looking to implement signs at all parks and public spaces that are treated with toxic pesticides. Right To Know signs stating “Keep off area. Treated with pesticides” signs as well as a text alert message to local residents when an area is treated with a chemical. Presented this idea to Jenny Brekhus. We are hoping to work with city council to vote on this item to review possibilities of implementing this program. We presented a presentation to the city of Reno including case studies of other cities and states with this successful program in place. http://renocitynv.iqm2.com/Citizens/Detail_Motion.aspx?Frame=&MeetingID=1100&MinutesID=1124&MediaPosition=654.238&ID=10007&Type=70&CssClass=%20style=

5b. Also presented this idea to Washoe County Health Department to notify citizens before they spray with the carcinogenic pesticides to kill mosquitoes in Washoe County. They were a no show for our scheduled meeting and have yet to return our phone calls, but started a NO SPRAY hotline that you can call and get on. Meaning, the county will not spray the toxic chemicals close to your home, but down the street. Did you know that pesticide exposure killed over 300,000 people last year? Did you know that west nile virus killed less than 300? Out of those 300 individuals who died from west nile virus, most were in hospice care. WNV is a common flu we all have been exposed to at one time in our life. Most of us never even know it.

bee hotel galena
Bryan, Elrik and Michael worked very hard to design, build and install our BeeYouTiful Bee Hotel. Thank you to Galena Volunteers who kicked in some extra back up when we needed it. Built at The Generator in Sparks Nevada, then transported onsite and installed.

bee-hotel-reno-nv

6. Won a grant to build Nevada’s largest Bee Hotel and Pesticide free garden. Used $4500 to build large insect hotel, two pesticide free pollinators gardens, hire Elrik Du Sallient to help with our Bee Hotel project and create k – 12 curriculum to teach students in Washoe County about pollinators and how to protect them. http://www.rgj.com/story/money/business/2014/12/17/rsar-selects-build-better-block-project-winner/20563171/

sparks reno realtors
Reno Sparks Association of Realtors Build a Better Block Grant Team!

http://www.ktvn.com/story/28709030/welcome-to-galenas-bee-hotel-3

7. Lobbied for pesticide free parks in Reno, Sparks, Carson City, Dayton and Lyon County with phone conferences, school districts, local leaders, Beyond Pesticides and local government via phone calls, in person meetings and social media.

history in the making for nevada
Chip Osborn – Beyond Pesticides Training at City Hall

8. Organized, marketed and secured free Pesticide Free training for 58 city, state, county and school park officials with Chip Osborn and Beyond Pesticides. As a result, now have 12 parks in City of Reno, 3 parks in Carson City Nevada and two large parks with Washoe County.

organic lawn care

9. Helped secure 2 parks in the city of Reno to be converted and maintained as pesticide free.  Wingfield Park and Barbara Bennett park: https://www.newsreview.com/reno/fly-away/content?oid=17430288

state of nevada going pesticide free
Carson City Nevada State Legislature is going pesticide free!

10. Help secure pesticide free grounds for our state legislature in Carson City Nevada. Currently training staff and monitoring soil for organic systems.

11. Worked with Carson City Nv Mayor Robert Crowell and his team to secure 3 large parks in Carson City Nevada as pesticide free.

12. Encouraged local Washoe County Health Department to begin to advertise their NO SPRAY zone. Gained media coverage on how fighting West Nile Virus with toxic chemicals defeats the counties purpose of protecting the health of its citizens.

13. Provided low cost and free organic lawn care classes in our community as well as presentations at local organizations.

14. Organized and promoted art shows to raise awareness about neonicotinoids and pesticide use at our public parks. Neonics are a class of pesticides found on every plant you buy that is not certified organic. This pesticide lasts up to 5 years, killing bees and other pollinators. Worked to have media coverage to share more organic lawn care tips to the public.

http://www.rgj.com/story/life/2015/06/08/nadadada-transform-motel-rooms-art-exhibits/28714857/

reno pesticide free gardens
Bee Habitat volunteers working hard for 3 days straight!

15. Planned and Installed an organic pollinator garden at Wildflower Village. We had to drive up to Grass Valley to buy certified organic flowers. Creative Gardens in Sparks Nevada donated organic flowers and soil thanks to Brian Eubanks our city Urban Forester.

16. Secured two of Washoe Counties largest parks to be converted and maintained as pesticide free. Currently working on obtaining sports fields within the county as pesticide free.

17. Created and maintained 4 large organic/wildlife related Facebook groups, Twitter accounts, Pinterest boards and Linkedin articles. We have over 11k followers.

18. Volunteer admin for How To Create A Toxic Free Community with world wide leaders in the organic movement. Educate, motivate and inspire moms, dads and members of the world to reduce the amount of toxins in their communities.

19. Organized a meeting of the minds dinner with Reno City Council Woman Naomi Duerr. Local environmental groups met for an evening of food and drinks, to share in an open forum what their groups are working on, what help they need if any and to network in a way to help foster growth in sustainability.

BAR O
Marcia Litsinger shows off a pumpkin growing at her market garden, Churchill Butte Organics. The Litsingers are part of the coalition of organic producers creating a new private organization, Basin and Range Organics, to continue organic.

20. Committee member for BAR O a new Nevada Organics Certified program to replace the defunct Nevada Agriculture Certification program. Working with Pat Lynch and board to market, educate and establish a NEW and Improved Organic Certification Program in Nevada. http://www.nevadaappeal.com/news/17457660-113/organization-plowing-ahead-to-provide-organic-certification

Mandela African Scholars
Mandela African Scholars at Silver Sage School in Nevada

21. Meet with Mandela African Scholars to discuss sustainability, pesticides exposures, GMO’s and organic farming alternatives at Silver Sage School and Healthy Communities event in Northern Nevada.

pollinators in reno

22. Help create and market The Pollinator Fair at Urban Roots. Led a kid friendly spelling bee, gave awards and prizes while educating the public on how to buy plants that are pesticide free. Face painting, honey bee watching, insects, organic plants and more! Kelsey and the team at Urban Roots rocked our socks that day!

reno garden art insect hotels reno nevada

22. Encourage YOU to Partner with local environmental groups to create real and immediate positive change for our community, friends and our children. Call Sandy at 775 453 6120 or email her at sandy @ bee habitat dot com.

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Pesticide Free Training for Northern Nevada!

history in the making for nevadaPlease see attached location and agenda for the pesticide free training at city hall. You must RSVP with the form link below to reserve your seats! Download Flyer here: Pesticide Free Training in Reno.

Download Agenda for Pesticide Free Parks training here.

We are confirmed for the training on Tuesday, July 28 in Council Chambers at Reno City Hall (1 E. First Street, Reno, NV 89501).

Check in will occur from 8-8:30 a.m. The city will have coffee and light snacks during that time.

The training will be from 8:30 a.m. – 4 p.m. Lunch to be served at 12 p.m.

Please RSVP with the link below or call Sandy @ 775 453 6120 to reserve your seat.

Can’t make the class? No worries, click here to get a copy of the course materials and information.

Here is the link to the online RSVP form: http://bit.ly/1M8j083

Sandy Rowley
BeeHabitat.com
775 453 6120

City Sample Management Plans Here.

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The Biggest Little Pollinator Fair in Reno Nevada

pollinators in renoThe Biggest Little Pollinator Fair will feature craft vendors, tasting stations, hands-on activities, and info sessions on native pollinators, strategies for attracting them and how to plan a pollinator garden.

When:   June 13 2015 1 – 4 PM
Where: Urban Roots Farm 3001 W. 4th Street Reno, Nevada

How: Free! All ages!
$5 suggested donation for take home crafts.

Learn more at www.pollinator.org and Join the event page here: https://www.facebook.com/events/447152262132666/

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Reno Nv Bees

Reno Garden Shops : Selling Poisonous Flowers?

Bad Buzz: Studies Say Neonic Pesticides Hurt Wild Bees

A common type of pesticide is dramatically harming wild bees, according to a new in-the-field study that outside experts say may help shift the way the U.S. government looks at a controversial class of chemicals.

But in the study published by the journal Nature on Wednesday, managed honeybees — which get trucked from place to place to pollinate major crops like almonds — didn’t show the significant ill effects that wild cousins like bumblebees did.

A second study published in the same journal showed that in lab tests bees are not repelled by the pesticides, and may even prefer pesticide-coated crops, making the problem worse.

http://www.nbcnews.com/science/environment/bad-buzz-studies-say-neonic-pesticides-hurt-wild-bees-n346356

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reno tourism

Reno Nevada Tourism : Reno City Council, help save our Bees!

reno tourism

Ask Reno Nevada Tourism and City Council too stop the use of bee killing pesticides on city property.

Reno Nevada can do better for the local wild life and community. Plant only pesticide free trees, flowers, plants, shrubs and seeds. USDA organic flowers are safe for bees and other pollinators and do not add to the pesticide loads in our communities.

Did you know that over 51% of Nevada’s water ways test positive for pesticides and other chemicals?

You can help reduce the pesticides in our community by signing and sharing this petition: https://secure.avaaz.org/en/petition/Reno_Nevada_City_Council_Ban_the_use_of_Bee_Killing_Pesticides_and_Herbacides_on_City_Property/

Please call Reno Nevada Tourism office and ask them to put pressure on our Reno City Council Men and Women to bann the use of bee killing NEONICOTINOIDS on city property.

Reno-Tahoe Visitor

www.visitrenotahoe.com
Google+ page

50 Washington St
Reno, NV
(775) 827-7333
4590 S Virginia St
Reno, NV
(775) 827-7600
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Vote for Bees!

i voted for the bees

We are buzzing with excitement!

Bee Habitat is one of 3 top finalist in the Reno Realtor’s Build a Better Block project.

vote bees 2014

Realtor’s Build a Better Block is a project of the Reno/Sparks Association of REALTORS designed to transform a current public space into a place for the community to gather and to offer a positive cultural or economic impact on the community. Bee Habitat is currently working on converting 28 parks in Reno and Sparks to be safe for pets, children and our native pollinators. Our soon to bee pesticide free parks will help reduce the pesticide/chemical load on our wildlife and our children.

reno bee party

Join us to help make a positive difference for our family, friends and community in Washoe County and BeeYond! Check out the bee YOU tiful plants and flowers we are working with at our first Pesticide FREE Reno Park here: http://www.pinterest.com/nataqua/idlewild-park-pollinator-garden/

 

Vote today here: http://www.rsar.net/PublicWelcome/realtors-build-a-better-block/rbbb-community-vote

vote for bees reno nevada

Sandy Rowley

Bee Habitat Founder

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You might see it all pass you by…

Rachelle Van Zanten – My Country (Official Video) from Taylor F. on Vimeo.

My Country – Rachelle Van Zanten

Hey there mister, take a good look at my country

It’s the natural bona fide high

When you look up from the numbers on your paper

You might see Yakista pass you by

You might see it all pass you by

My harlem grows 500 miles from the city

‘Neath the poplars and the ever-evergreens

I roam the hills to the shorelines of the Deni

Drink the water and we raise our families

Drink the water and we raise our families

And now there’s trouble here, in a land so far away

Where all the dark suits make the rules from 1000 miles away

I’ve seen your future here, I’ve read the history

You make your money grow while killing my country

Hey there mister, take a good look at my country

It’s the Eden and the apple of my eye

You come up from your office in the city

I will meet you at the river by and by

I can not let this pass me by

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Our Agenda for Washoe County

Meeting with local park officials Tuesday Aug 26th 2014.
Coming up next for Bee Habitat, next week, we are meeting with the City of Reno and Washoe County park officials to discuss converting all public parks to a pesticide free park plan.
When?       Aug 26th 2014 @ 1:30
Where?    Washoe County Community Services Department      @                        3101 Longley Lane, Reno Nevada
Who?       City of Reno, Washoe County Park Officials & Bee Habitat                                        Volunteers
Why?       Discuss converting all public parks to pesticide free
What are we asking from Reno and Washoe county parks department? 

We are asking for Pesticide Free Parks, Bee Habitats throughout the city and transparency in regards to what, where, who, why, when and how much does it cost (or who got paid how much) to treat with pesticides in Washoe County and City of Reno Nv. 

1. We need to know what is being sprayed, where, why, when, by who and how much? this information needs to be public and shared between each department and the public online. can easily be added to an online map where the public and local authorities can better track the life of these chemicals in our water, land and public areas.

2. We need protected areas at city and county parks that are pesticide free. marked as such. this needs to be an ordinance and/or law.

3. Notification alert system:  when a chemical is going to be used: we need to know when, why, where, who, how much? sent via email, text, phone call and/or with media outlets. 

4.  What date can we start phasing out pesticides? what park will be the first park we convert? how can this be an ordinance/law for Washoe County?

– current trees, shrubs, plants, bushes, flowers that are GMO and/or roundup ready in public areas.

– name of vendor they buy plants, chemicals, supplies from with yearly budget of department.

– how long have they used these pesticides? is their historical data online?

We must use BEE Safe plants as not all are safe.

As always, call anytime with questions.

All the best,
Sandy Rowley
BeeHabitat.com
775 453 6120
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